This writer was not compensated for reviewing this product and her opinions are her own.

When in-person support groups weren’t meeting the mark for one of the founders of the app, Huddle, he developed a solution. How about an app that provides community support through video?

I recently chatted with Tyler, one of the founders of Huddle, and he described how the app was developed to support addicts in recovery. They have since expanded this app to provide group chats for people with anxiety, self-image issues, eating disorders and physical disabilities, to name a few. Huddle is also proud to support undocumented individuals who need support. They have an “Immigrant” support group where people can discuss their anxieties, stories and hopes for the future.

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Their groups include:

  • Depression
  • Self-Image
  • Addiction
  • Stress & Anxiety
  • Relationships
  • High School Problems
  • College Stress
  • Military girlfriends/wives
  • People of Color
  • Abuse Recovery
  • Healthy Lifestyle Support
  • Bipolar
  • Borderline Personality Disorder/EUPD
  • Dissociative Disorders
  • ADD/ADHD
  • Semicolon Group
  • Side Effects
  • Eating Disorders
  • Grief and Loss
  • LGBTQ + Community
  • Women’s Experiences
  • Support For The Betrayer
  • Body Positivity
  • PTSD + CPTSD
  • Quitting Tobacco
  • Parenting
  • Self-Love
  • Social Anxiety
  • Trichotillomania
  • Spectrum
  • Family Problems
  • Poz (HIV + status)
  • Caregivers
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Physical Disability
  • Immigrant’s Experience
  • Spina Bifida

Huddle believes that video provides a better conversation than text. When people are reaching out for help a text mesage can only go so far. Delayed responses in texts can be harmful to someone in need.

I have tested out Huddle’s app and one of the pieces I like is that you can choose to have your picture pixelated. Tyler mentioned that they notice people begin un-pixelating their pictures after they get comfortable in a group. I have facilitated group therapy sessions before and I have seen similar comfort levels change after people begin to feel less judgment and more open to share.

This app is easy to navigate and I love how it provides a synopsis of what to expect within each group. Plus, they provide hotline numbers for anyone in crisis. The app has a no-bullying policy as well.

As I spoke to Tyler about my work in outpatient settings he said that they hoped Huddle could be used as aftercare for someone exiting inpatient or outpatient treatment. When someone leaves addiction or mental health treatment, they are reminded a million times to “go to meetings” and “call your support network” but I always wonder if they stick to those promises. This app could be another resource for people who don’t have the time or financial means to attend meetings or support groups.

Peer networks and social supports are crucial in an age of isolation and tech addiction. The premise behind this app is client centered, sensitive to people’s mental health needs and appears to lessen the barriers people face when seeking support outside of their inner circle.

This app is now available on iTunes and you can join the waiting list for Android here!